London tower fire: 58 people missing presumed dead, say police

Oceane Deschanel
Junho 19, 2017

Police now say at least 58 people are presumed dead following a horrific fire Wednesday that destroyed a high-rise apartment building - and the people who lived there are demanding answers.

In an interview, she was questioned over whether there was a need for the United Kingdom government to accept some responsibility for what had happened.

As the victims of the fire entered the Downing Street, hundreds of demonstrators had gathered in Whitehall to protest against the prime minister.

Mrs May was greeted with cries of "coward" and "shame on you" as she returned to the site of the devastating fire in west London on Friday.

He is hopeful the two-and-a-half hour meeting, attended by victims, residents, community leaders and volunteers, was the starting point for a process of "lasting change".

British Labour MP David Lammy called for arrests to be made over what he labelled "corporate manslaughter", lambasting Britain's public housing crisis which he says has left towers like Grenfell in appalling condition.

Told there was a need for the public to hear her say something had gone badly wrong and the Government accepted responsibility, Mrs May said: "Something awful has happened".

The government has committed 5 million pounds for clothes, food and emergency supplies for the victims.

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A woman touches a poster for 12-year-old Jessica Urbano on a tribute wall Friday after laying flowers on the side of a church next to the Grenfell Tower in London. London Police's investigation remains on-going, as fire crews continue the grim and slow task of identifying and recovering bodies from inside the tower.

On Saturday, Mrs May acknowledged that support for survivors and families of the victims "was not good enough".

Building officials have not commented since the fire.

London has a chronic housing shortage even in the best of times, and those left homeless by the fire - already angry over what they see as government inequity and incompetence - fear being forced out of the British capital.

Siobhan Campbell worked in the social services office on the first floor of Grenfell Tower from 2005 to 2010, where she was involved in rehousing families.

The recovery operation in the 24-storey tower has resumed but could take weeks, the BBC said.

They said: "We naturally welcome funds for those in need, though this does show once more the tendency to sideline residents' views".

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