New dress code for players on the LPGA tour

Vincent De Villiers
Julho 18, 2017

Women who break the new rules risk being fined $1000 - with penalties doubling each time the dress code is broken, United States magazine Golf Digest reported.

The Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) has come in for stiff criticism after it introduced a new dress code that forbids women golfers from sporting plunging necklines, leggings or revealing skirts on the course.

"Women and girls should wear what makes them feel comfortable when taking part in sport and should not be deterred by unnecessary dress codes".

According to Golf Digest, LPGA Player President Vicki Goetze-Ackerman sent out an email to golfers on July 2 informing them that the dress code would be changing as of Monday, July 17.

Plunging necklines are NOT allowed.

A measure also requires players dress "appropriate" and "professional" at events off-course organized by the LPGA.

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Length of skirt, skort, and shorts MUST be long enough to not see your bottom area (even if covered by under shorts) at any time, standing or bent over.

Workout gear and jeans (all colors) [are] NOT allowed inside the ropes.

LPGA players will have to pay extra attention to their dress standards after the governing body released a new dress code standard. Unless otherwise told "no", golf clothes are acceptable.

Heather Daly-Donofrio, the LGA tour's chief communications and tour operations officer, told Golf Digest that the goal was for players "to present themselves in a professional manner to reflect a positive image for the game".

She went on to suggest that someone can look professional in leggings.

The enforcement of dress codes which disproportionately impact women, from workplaces to planes, has been increasingly under attack by campaigners who argue that telling women what to wear is unfair and contributes to body-shaming.

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