'N Korean missiles can reach Guam in 14 minutes'

Patrice Gainsbourg
Agosto 13, 2017

North Korea wants an end to annual military drills between the United States and South Korea that it condemns as invasion rehearsals, and the removal of tens of thousands of USA troops stationed in the South.

South Korea's conservatives want still more sanctions and pressure; they call his pleas for talks a "one-sided love affair".

Guam is armed with the U.S. Army's defense system known as Terminal High Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, which can intercept missiles.

"Do not look at the flash or fireball - it can blind you", the note said.

Those who can't get indoors or behind some type of protections should simply lie down and cover their heads.

Guam's Homeland Security Advisor George Charfauros said Friday it would take 14 minutes for a missile fired from North Korea to reach Guam.

Japan has in the past vowed to shoot down North Korean missiles or rockets that threaten to hit its territory. Essentially, even a small task like cutting off the engines just 0.0005 seconds off the right moment can make the missile go off course by four or five kilometers. He did not elaborate.

"So unless those North Korean missiles were to fall short, the Patriots shouldn't have a function to serve in this particular case", he said.

Additionally, the USA military at Guam has the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense missile interceptor system, perhaps the most reliable on earth.

For Pyongyang, Guam is seen as a prime target because it's the closest U.S. military presence on American soil to North Korea, and because military assets from here are sometimes deployed near the Korean Peninsula.

As tensions continue to ratchet up over North Korea's pursuit of a nuclear missile capable of striking the US, CNN has spoken to multiple officials with a detailed knowledge of how the US will determine if any North Korean missile launch poses a threat that requires the US military to shoot it down. No other details were given about Monday's meeting. The fact that the American government considered an evacuation of its civilians in South Korea tells a lot.

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If he did, Mr. Kim would be seen as weak in the standoff with the United States, said Kim Dong-yub, an analyst at Kyungnam University's Institute for Far Eastern Studies in Seoul. "South Korea military exercises".

At Mosa's Joint, in Guam's capital Hagatna, Thursday happy hour lasts until 8 p.m.

South Korea's military also said it was prepared for swift action with respect to North Korea's moves. She added: "I think escalating the rhetoric is the wrong answer".

In response, Trump on Tuesday threatened the communist country "with fire and fury".

Rep. David Cicilline (sihs-ihl-EE'-nee) of Rhode Island, a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, says that in light of President Donald Trump's "reckless words" threatening North Korea, the House should immediately take up legislation barring a pre-emptive nuclear strike without prior congressional authorization.

However, as customers sip on their coffee and grab lunch, Kim Jong Un's threat is what many are talking about.

"It's business as usual in paradise", said Josh Tyquengco, marketing director at Guam Visitors Bureau, the official agency for the island.

"Faith is so deeply rooted into our culture", he said. We have to forewarn our citizens to be on the lookout.

North Korea's military has reacted angrily by stating its preparedness to "contain" the USA bases on the Pacific island of Guam with missile strikes.

"Nobody really deserves to be caught in the middle of these games", said Victoria-Lola Leon Guerrero, an activist who campaigns for a lowered military presence.

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